Optoelectronics and nano-photonics

Our research is focused on the development of next-generation optoelectronic devices, combining the latest breakthroughs in nano-photonic and electronic materials research. We specialise in the fabrication of devices that interact with light between the ultraviolet and far infrared portions of the spectrum. This can be applied across solar cells, photodetectors, optical filters, lasers, holograms and modulators.

Capabilities

  • Far infrared multispectral thermal image sensors
  • Nanophotonic Pixels for subwavelength imaging on a chip
  • Carrier-selective contacts for high efficiency silicon photovoltaics
  • Mid- and long-wave infrared photodetectors based on nano-optics and two-dimensional materials
  • Optical metasurfaces for reconfigurable optoelectronic devices
  • Carrier trapping processes in nanostructured optoelectronic devices
  • Spectrometer-on-a-chip systems
  • Colourimetric sensor chips for lab-on-a-smartphone

Research projects

Nanophotonics

We harness the unusual ways that light interacts with nanostructured materials to demonstrate new photonic devices including photodetectors and lasers with enhanced performance and/or functionality.

Research leads:

Electronic and Photonic Sensing Platforms

We integrate photonics and electronics on a single platform to create sensors with features not possible otherwise. Our research spans CMOS image sensors, sensors suitable for aerial platforms such as drones, single sensor based multispectral imaging system, on-chip direct RF to optical conversion and miniscope.  The impact is far reaching and applied across many sectors including areas of precision agriculture, security, medical devices, communication and aerospace.

Research lead:

Photovoltaics

Our research is centered on the exploration of novel materials for carrier-selective contacts and photo absorbers in advanced photovoltaics. This involves the optimisation of metal oxides, fluorides and sulfides among other materials to improve their electron and hole collecting capabilities on semiconductor surfaces.

Research lead: